Pest Management Plan


Acknowledgments

This Pest Management Plan was prepared by the Suffolk County Department of Health Services, pursuant to Local Law 34-1999. It was prepared in consultation with the Pest Management Committee. The Suffolk County Department of Health Services would like to acknowledge the assistance of the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County in preparing this Plan.

1. Intent of Pest Management Plan

The intent of this Pest Management Plan is to meet the requirements of Local Law 34-1999 (see Appendix A). Specifically, this Local Law calls for the phase out of most pesticide use by the County of Suffolk, to be completed by January 2002. This Pest Management Plan provides a framework for County Departments and Agencies for handling pest problems in a manner consistent with the requirements of Local Law 34-1999. As stated in the Local Law, the Pest Management Plan shall address pest population monitoring, the use of least toxic pesticides prior to January 2002 and non-chemical pest control strategies for use after 2002, so that pest problems can be effectively managed in a comprehensive manner. Therefore, the emphasis of this Plan is on prevention and the use of alternatives to traditional chemical pesticides.

2. Requirements

Beginning January 1, 2000, the use of any pesticide classified as Toxicity Category I or as a known, likely or possible carcinogen by the USEPA is prohibited (see Appendix B for a description of Toxicity Categories and carcinogenicity classifications). By January 1, 2001, the prohibited pesticides are expanded to include any pesticide classified as Toxicity Category II and any restricted use pesticide.

After January 1, 2002, use of pesticides on County property shall not be allowed. The following exemptions will apply:

  1. Pesticides used to maintain a safe drinking water supply;
  2. Anti-microbial pesticides;
  3. Containerized rodent baits;
  4. Pesticides that are exempt under 40 CFR 152.25 (see Appendix C);
  5. Biological pesticides (e.g., BT);
  6. Low toxicity pesticides; and
  7. Low toxicity pesticides for the control of vectors which are capable of transmitting diseases.

Local Law 34-1999 gives the Suffolk County Department of Health Services (SCDHS) the responsibility to oversee the implementation of this Local Law. In addition, the SCDHS is directed to adopt a Pest Management Plan.

Two committees are also established by this Local Law; the Pest Management Committee and the Community Advisory Committee (CAC). The Pest Management Committee is directed to "inventory all materials and data on the current use, application, impact and effectiveness of pesticides". This committee expires on 12/31/00. The role of the CAC is to oversee the implementation of this Local Law by the SCDHS and to prepare an annual report to the Suffolk County Legislature.

3. Applicability

This Pest Management Plan pertains to all County Departments or Agencies or pesticide applicators hired by the County as a contractor or subcontractor for the purposes of pest control. This Plan includes all properties owned (including those that are leased to another) or leased to the County. Properties owned by the County, but leased to another, are exempt from the requirements of this law until expiration of the current lease.

4. Definitions

A. Anti-microbial pesticides: shall include;

  1. Disinfectants intended to destroy or irreversibly inactivate infectious or other undesirable bacteria, pathogenic fungi, or viruses on surfaces of inanimate objects;
  2. Sanitizers intended to reduce the number of living bacteria or viable virus particles on inanimate surfaces, in water, or in air;
  3. Bacteriostats intended to inhibit the growth of bacteria in the presence of moisture;
  4. Sterilizers intended to destroy viruses and all living bacteria, fungi and their spores, on inanimate surfaces;
  5. Fungicides and fungistats intended to inhibit the growth of, or destroy, fungi (including yeast), pathogenic to man or other animals on inanimate surfaces; and
  6. Commodity preservatives and protectants to inhibit the growth of or destroy bacteria in or on raw materials (such as adhesives and plastics) used in manufacturing, or manufactured procedures (such as fuel, textiles, lubricants, and paints) but not in the pulp and paper process or cooling towers.

B. Biological pesticides: pesticides that are derived from natural materials, such as animals, plants, bacteria and certain minerals, as defined by the USEPA. These may include microbial pesticides (which contain a microorganism as the active ingredient), plant-pesticides (which are substances that plants produce from genetic material that has been added to the plant), and biochemical pesticides (which are natural substances that control pests through non-toxic mechanisms). Appendix D provides background information from the EPA regarding biological pesticides.

C. Biological controls: a non-chemical pest control method, typically composed of whole organisms that are used to control pest populations (e.g., ladybugs). Refer to Appendix E for more information.

D. Low toxicity pesticides: pesticides that are determined by the Commissioner of the Suffolk County Department of Health Services to be of such low toxicity that their use would have a de minimis adverse impact on health (e.g., boric acid).

5. Inventory

An inventory of the "current use, application, impact and effectiveness of pesticides" shall be completed by the Pest Management Committee. Once the initial inventory is completed by the Pest Management Committee, it is the intent of this Plan that subsequent annual inventories also be completed. The purpose of these annual inventories will be to monitor the use of pesticides and to assist in identifying pest problem areas that need further investigation and research. A uniform inventory reporting form will be developed by the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County and periodically reviewed or updated. Each County Department and Agency will complete the inventory form on an annual basis. The inventory will be maintained by the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County.

This inventory will also identify existing stocks of pesticides that can no longer be used. Identifying the quantity of existing "unusable" stock is important because it will provide an indication of the need for a hazardous waste collection program for County Departments and Agencies.

6. Leases and Contracts

Leases with landlords and tenants will need to incorporate the requirements of Local Law 34-1999. In addition, contracts with companies for the purposes of pest control will also have to address pest control practices that are consistent with this Pest Management Plan. In September, a letter was sent to all landlords of properties rented by the County, by the Suffolk County Law Department. This letter informed landlords of the requirements of this law.

The need for addenda to current leases and contracts should be evaluated by affected Departments and Agencies. Leases and contracts should include language which refers affected parties to the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County for guidance on handling pest problems.

7. Approach to Handling/Preventing Pest Problems

This section identifies and recommends different approaches that can be used to help avoid and prevent pest problems before they occur. This section also addresses how to handle existing pest problems on properties that are affected by Local Law 34-1999.

A. Prevention:

The following recommended preventative practices have been divided into indoor and outdoor pest problems.

Indoor Pest Problems (adapted from Standard Operating Procedures for Pest Management for Suffolk County Buildings, prepared by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County).

For indoor pests of buildings and concessions, suggested preventative practices include but are not limited to:

  • Eating and drinking in designated areas of the building;
  • Promptly removing trash from receptacles;
  • Keeping break areas and coffee stations clean;
  • Storing food in pest proof containers;
  • Making sure trash receptacles have secure lids;
  • Avoiding standing water in drainage saucers of office plants;
  • Removing infested or diseased plants from the office area;
  • Keeping office pets free of pest infestations;
  • Not propping open windows or doors;
  • Inspecting deliveries for evidence of pests and label stock with the current date;
  • Rotating stock, using product first in, first out method;
  • Discarding food that has passed expiration as well as old produce;
  • Following the Suffolk County Sanitary Code in regard to food storage, preparation and handling.

For more detailed information about handling and preventing indoor pest problems, refer to Appendix F.

Outdoor Pest Problems

For pests of outdoor grounds and landscapes the following preventative practices are recommended:

  • Selecting healthy "pest-free" and "disease-resistant" plants that are appropriate for the location;
  • Considering soil type, pH of soil, grade and hardiness zone when selecting plant varieties;
  • Installing and properly maintaining a 2-4 inch mulch surface/ ring around all plants to prevent weeds from growing, keeping the roots cool and moist and protecting the plants from lawn mowers and weed eaters;
  • Making sure that adequate moisture is available to new plantings for the first two years;
  • Selecting turfgrass species or cultivars that are well-adapted to local soil and environmental conditions;
  • Maintaining a dense turf with a well developed root system and not mowing turf too short where ever possible;
  • Reducing mowing during dry periods;
  • Dumping standing water from any outside containers to avoid mosquito breeding;
  • Maintaining healthy plants with appropriate fertilization and irrigation;
  • Repairing and pruning damaged trees during the dormant season;
  • For some disease problems, removing and replacing infected plants with unsusceptible species may be necessary; and
  • Removing weeds before they go to seed.

For more detailed information about landscape pests and their prevention refer to Appendix G.

B. Scouting and Monitoring

Scouting and monitoring are very important tools for tracking the presence of pests, as well as their development over time. By properly identifying potential pest problems before they occur, infestation and property damage can often be avoided. When scouting and monitoring, it is important to know what the pest history of the property is and to develop records identifying target pests. Once pests are identified, they can then be monitored through visual observation, physical trapping or enumeration, to determine the source of the pest population and its epidemiology. Strategies can then be developed to manage the pest before damage occurs. It is recommended that each County Department identify personnel to conduct these monitoring and scouting activities. Training for monitoring and scouting will be provided by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, and coordinated with the SCDHS.

C. Handling Pest Problems:

For recommendations on how to handle pest problems, County Departments or their employees can contact Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Cornell Cooperative Extension educators can assist with problem identification and diagnosis, as well as provide recommendations on how to scout, monitor and control pest problems. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County can also provide training and educational materials upon request.

8. Guidance on the Use of Pesticide Products

The intent of this Plan is to prevent pest problems from occurring so that pesticides are not needed. However, should the need arise to control a pest population through the use of pesticides, products containing an active ingredient that is exempt could be utilized when appropriate. As mentioned in the previous section, County Departments are encouraged to seek the advice of the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County on the best way to handle a pest problem.

The SCDHS, along with the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, will provide guidance for County Departments on the pesticides products that are exempt from this Local Law. Appendices C, D, and E provide background information on those active ingredients that are exempt under 40 CFR 152.25, biological pesticides and biological controls, respectively. As additional information becomes available it will be included in this plan and forwarded to County Departments. The SCDHS will attempt to notify County Departments when we become aware that the status of a pesticide product has changed.

County Departments are encouraged to approach the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County for guidance on whether a pesticide product is appropriate for the pest problem and meets the exemption requirements of the law.

If a pest problem occurs for which there is no effective pesticide product that meets the criteria for exemption, a County Department may request that the SCDHS review a pesticide product for determination of whether the pesticide presents a de minimis risk. The affected Department will be asked to provide supporting information such as:

  • Name of the pesticide product;
  • EPA registration number of the product;
  • Active ingredient, including the CAS number;
  • Manufacturer;
  • Copy of the label and Material Safety Data Sheet if available;
  • The nature and implications of the pest problem;
  • Any corrective action that has already been attempted; and
  • Any additional comments regarding the need to use this product.

The SCDHS shall establish a committee of staff knowledgeable in the health implications of pesticide use to review the characteristics of the pesticide product. This committee will review the information provided, as well as information from other sources (e.g., EPA, on-line databases) to determine if use of the pesticide product would present a de minimis health risk. Input from the EPA, as well as the New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (NYDEC) and Health (NYDOH) and the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County will be solicited.

9. Public Emergency

Should an emergency situation arise, the Commissioner of SCDHS may issue a written declaration of a public emergency. In such cases, a pesticide not meeting the requirements of exemption may be used temporarily to mitigate the public emergency. The SCDHS will ensure that the least toxic approach to effectively mitigate the public emergency is used. Following such action, the SCDHS, with the assistance of the affected Department and the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, will prepare a report within 30 days. This report will document the nature and effect of the public emergency, how the problem causing the emergency arose, steps taken to resolve the emergency and the justification for pesticide use. The steps that the County is taking to ensure that a similar problem does not occur in the future will also be provided in the report.

10. Golf Course Emergency

Under the Local Law, the Superintendent may declare a golf course emergency if there is an "imminent threat of property damage". In such cases, materials that would otherwise be prohibited may be used. Any actions taken under this local law will be consistent with the settlement of LI Neighborhood Network v. County of Suffolk and the Organic Parks Maintenance Plan for Suffolk County Golf Courses and Parklands. A copy of this Organic Parks Maintenance Plan is provided in Appendix H.
Should the Superintendent declare a Golf Course Emergency he/she shall:

  1. Notify the Chairman of the CAC;
  2. Inform two members of the CAC as to the next step to solve the problem;
  3. Within a reasonable time period, the Superintendent shall meet with the CAC to discuss the emergency situation;
  4. The Superintendent may declare three Golf Course Emergencies for each Golf Course. After three emergencies, he/she must meet with the CAC prior to taking any additional action;
  5. Within 30 days, the Superintendent shall submit a written report to the Chairman of the CAC, explaining the nature, cause and effect of the emergency, steps taken to resolve the emergency and how and why these actions were taken. The Superintendent shall take the least toxic approach to resolving the Golf Course Emergency; and
  6. The Superintendent shall meet with the CAC within 60 days of taking the above action to discuss the contents of the written report.

Should the Superintendent require guidance on the least toxic approach to resolve the Golf Course Emergency, he/she is encouraged to consult with the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County or SCDHS.

11. Revisions to the Pest Management Plan

As necessary, this Plan will be revised and updated to accommodate new information, as it becomes available. Copies of the revised Plan will be distributed to the CAC, the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County and all affected County Departments and Agencies.


Appendix F

Indoor Pest Control References

Beasts Begone! A Practicioner's Guide to IPM in Buildings. New York State IPM Program publication number 609

Evict and Exile Mice from your Home. New York State IPM Program publication number 603.

Found a Cockroach? Don't Panic. New York State IPM Program publication number 602.
IPM For Homes: How to use integrated pest management to uninvite residential pests. New York State IPM Program publication number 604.

Part I Pest Management Around the Home. A Cornell Cooperative Extension Publication Miscellaneous Bulletin S74.


AppendixG

Outdoor Pest Control References

Albany County Pesticide Sunset Ordinance Training Manual. Prepared by Lynn Braband of the Community Integrated Pest Management Program of Cornell University.

IPM For Homes: How to use integrated pest management to uninvite residential pests. New York State IPM Program publication number 604.

Part I Pest Management Around the Home. A Cornell Cooperative Extension Publication Miscellaneous Bulletin S74.

What's all the buzz about mosquitoes? New York State IPM Program publication number 606.

Contact

Tamson Yeh
Pest Management / Turf Specialist
tsy3@cornell.edu
631-727-7850 x 240

Last updated March 29, 2017