Stewartia pseudocamellia, Japanese Stewartia - 2000

Stewartia pseudocamellia, Japanese Stewartia - 2000

Lonicera sempervirens, Trumpet Honeysuckle - 2010

Lonicera sempervirens, Trumpet Honeysuckle - 2010

Abelia x grandiflora ‘Rose Creek’, Dwarf Glossy Abelia - 2009

Abelia x grandiflora ‘Rose Creek’, Dwarf Glossy Abelia - 2009

Carex morrowii ‘Ice Dance’, Variegated Evergreen Sedge - 2009

Carex morrowii ‘Ice Dance’, Variegated Evergreen Sedge - 2009

Long Island Gold Medal Plant Program

The Long Island Gold Medal Plant Program began in 1999 and is administered by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. The mission of the Gold Medal Plant Program is to identify and promote exceptional ornamental plants that will thrive in the Long Island home landscape. Increased public education and awareness of sustainable plant selections are the main goals of the Program.

Four award-winning plants are selected each year, which may be trees, shrubs, perennials, vines, groundcovers, grasses, or annuals. Gold Medal Plant Winners are identified by the Plant Selection Committee, which is a volunteer group of horticulture professionals.


What is a Gold Medal Plant?

The Long Island Gold Medal Plant Program began in 1999 in an effort to promote exceptional under-utilized plants for Long Island gardens and landscapes. The selection committee represents a wide cross-section of the local nursery and landscape industry.


Why are Gold Medal Plants special?

  • Proven performance in Long Island garden settings
  • Pest-free with multi-season ornamental appeal
  • Adaptable to challenging landscape conditions
  • Easily grown by those of any skill level
  • Widely available from local wholesale/retail sources


2015 Award Winners


    

Aucuba japonica ‘Serratifolia’ (Serrated Japanese Aucuba)

Serrated Japanese aucuba fills a niche as one of the premier broadleaf evergreen shrubs for light to deep shade. Foliage remains pristine through most of Long Island winters especially when the plants are sited out of winter sun and wind. The shrub will grow 6-8 feet tall and functions well as a hedge, or as a component of the woodland shrub border. Pruning is handled well and the species is moderately tolerant of salt spray and poor soil as long as drainage is good. It is a suitable alternative to Prunus laurocerasus ‘Schipkaensis’ (Skip Laurel) without the foliage problems.


Hydrangea paniculata ‘Limelight’ (Limelight Hydrangea)

Limelight hydrangea is a much-loved deciduous shrub for its strong upright form, winter hardiness, and profuse display of flowers throughout the season. The large panicle flowers are borne on new growth and change from hues of lime green to white and mature to a soft pink. Planted as a hedge or singular planting in a mixed border, the effect in bloom is dramatic. A shrub grows 6 to 10 feet tall and about 5 feet wide in full or part sun with well-drained soil preferred. In spring, prune back to strong lateral buds to maintain growth and vigor.







Coreopsis ‘Full Moon’ Big Bang™ (Full Moon Tickseed)

The long-blooming nature and reliability of this hardy perennial make it a workhorse of the garden. This wildflower works en masse, as a specimen planting in a mixed border, or in a container garden. The 3” diameter, canary-yellow flowers begin to show in early summer, with rebloom in fall if sheared. Tickseed has a graceful mounding habit reaching 16-20 inches and 18-24 inches wide. Full sun and average moisture are preferred, although poor soils and drought are tolerated once established.


Lagerstroemia indica x faurieri ‘Natchez’ (Natchez Crape myrtle)

This upright, multi-stemmed deciduous shrub or small tree offers beauty in each season. Spring leaves emerge as bronzy red and mature to a glossy dark green. In August, panicles of bright white flowers adorn nearly every stem tip. Brilliant leaf shades of yellow, orange, and red and the ornate multi-colored bark decorate the fall and winter landscape. Natchez crape myrtle does best sited in full sun in moist, acidic soils. Allow room to grow since mature size is 20 feet in width and height.

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Contact

Mina Vescera
Nursery and Landscape Specialist
mv365@cornell.edu
631-727-7850 x 213

Last updated March 13, 2015