Stewartia pseudocamellia, Japanese Stewartia - 2000

Stewartia pseudocamellia, Japanese Stewartia - 2000

Lonicera sempervirens, Trumpet Honeysuckle - 2010

Lonicera sempervirens, Trumpet Honeysuckle - 2010

Abelia x grandiflora ‘Rose Creek’, Dwarf Glossy Abelia - 2009

Abelia x grandiflora ‘Rose Creek’, Dwarf Glossy Abelia - 2009

Carex morrowii ‘Ice Dance’, Variegated Evergreen Sedge - 2009

Carex morrowii ‘Ice Dance’, Variegated Evergreen Sedge - 2009

Long Island Gold Medal Plant Program

The Long Island Gold Medal Plant Program began in 1999 and is administered by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. The mission of the Gold Medal Plant Program is to identify and promote exceptional ornamental plants that will thrive in the Long Island home landscape. Increased public education and awareness of sustainable plant selections are the main goals of the Program.

Four award-winning plants are selected each year, which may be trees, shrubs, perennials, vines, groundcovers, grasses, or annuals. Gold Medal Plant Winners are identified by the Plant Selection Committee, which is a volunteer group of horticulture professionals.


What is a Gold Medal Plant?

The Long Island Gold Medal Plant Program began in 1999 in an effort to promote exceptional under-utilized plants for Long Island gardens and landscapes. The selection committee represents a wide cross-section of the local nursery and landscape industry.


Why are Gold Medal Plants special?

  • Proven performance in Long Island garden settings
  • Pest-free with multi-season ornamental appeal
  • Adaptable to challenging landscape conditions
  • Easily grown by those of any skill level
  • Widely available from local wholesale/retail sources


2014 Award Winners


    

Camellia japonica April Series, C. x Winter Series

These durable, evergreen shrubs offer exquisite, glossy, dark green leaves year round, with colorful flowers ranging from pure white to deep pink and red at select times of the year. Best planted in spring, this species prefers rich, acidic, well-drained soil and partial shade. Best new cultivars to consider are: ‘Winter’s Joy’, ‘Winter’s Darling, ‘April Kiss’, ‘April Rose’ and ‘April Tryst’.


Cornus florida (Flowering Dogwood)

This classic American native tree displays pure white to pink showy bracts in spring with rich shades of red and maroon foliage in fall. Glossy red berries and a rough, ornamental bark offer winter interest. Proper siting in full sun or partial shade with eastern exposure and excellent air circulation will help alleviate disease pressure. Rich, organic well-drained soil is preferred along with 1-2 inches of mulch for newly planted trees.







Ilex crenata ‘Soft Touch’
(Soft Touch Japanese Holly)

This semi-dwarf shrub has fine glossy, evergreen foliage that is softer to the touch than most other Japanese holly cultivars. Its dense habit (2-3 feet wide and high), and dark foliage makes it a suitable alternative to boxwood for hedges and foundation plantings. Well-drained soil in full sun or partial shade is preferred for optimal performance. Drought, heat, and pest resistant once established.


Nepeta racemosa ‘Blue Wonder’
(Blue Wonder Catmint)

The gray-green, aromatic foliage along with the profusion of lavender-blue flowers in early to mid-summer makes this a striking perennial for the garden. The low, spreading growth habit (12 inches in height) is suitable for foundation and front of the border plantings. Catmint prefers well-drained soil in full sun or partial shade, and can tolerate hot and dry locations. After bloom, plants should be cut back for a fall flush of flowers. Deer and rabbit resistant.

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Contact

Mina Vescera
Nursery and Landscape Specialist
mv365@cornell.edu
631-727-7850 x 213

Last updated December 12, 2014